Category Archives: Egyptian Arabic

Egyptian self-taught (Arabic)

egyptian-self-taught-arabic

Egyptian self-taught (Arabic) :

containing alphabet and pronunciation–vocabularies–elementary grammar–idiomatic phrases & conversations–travel talk–money, weights and measures (1914)

It has been the fashion since the occupation of Egypt to speak slightingly of the colloquial form of Arabic in use there.

This is partly because, as is the case in every country, the commoner forms of speech seem uncouth and unclassical to students who have learnt their Arabic either in universities, from munshis in India, or from Syrians (who are frequently in Egypt the professed instructors).

The basis of the common speech is, however, classical, though not directly recognisable as such. The fact that some of the words have not been encountered in the comparatively scanty literature of the Arabs, nor in the Koran, does not preclude them from being Arabic, though the forms of speech may not rant higher than such English forms as shan’t, ain’t, and I’ve.

https://archive.org/details/egyptianselftaug00thim_201701

Colloquial Arabic : The vernacular speech of Egypt, Syria

Colloquial Arabic with notes on the vernacular speech of Egypt, Syria, and Mesopotamia, and an appendix on the local characteristics of Algerian dialect

Colloquial Arabic; with notes on the vernacular speech of Egypt, Syria, and Mesopotamia, and an appendix on the local characteristics of Algerian dialect

This manual aims at providing an easy guide to the colloquial Arabic of Egypt, Syria, and Mesopotamia.
There are differences of usage and pronunciation between those several parts, but they are differences in detail, not separate languages, and there seems no good reason why they may not be treated reasonably together provided that reference is made, as here, to those differences. To a very large extent those countries have had a common cultural life with close and constant intercourse, and so the language which has served as a medium of that intercourse has a very large common factor.
Author: O’Leary, De Lacy, b. 1872  |  Publisher: London, Paul
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT

https://archive.org/details/ColloquialArabic1963

Arabic Proverbs: Illustrated from Their Proverbial Sayings Current at Cairo

Arabic Proverbs: Illustrated from Their Proverbial Sayings Current at Cairo

Arabic Proverbs

THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE MODERN EGYPTIANS, 
ILLUSTRATED FROM THEIR PROVERBIAL SAYINGS CURRENT AT CAIRO 

IT may be as well to state, that the lectures which are here published were never delivered as a complete course, but only one here and two there, as matter gradually grew under my hands ; yet so that very much the greater part of what is contained in this volume has been at one time or another actually delivered.
Although I have always taken a lively interest in national proverbs, I had no intention at the first of making a book about them ; but only selected the subject as one which I thought, though I was not confident of this, might afford me sufficient material for a single lecture, which I had undertaken some time ago to deliver. I confess that I was at the time almost…

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https://archive.org/details/arabicproverbsi00burcgoog_201701

Say It in Arabic (Egyptian dialect)

say it in Arabic

Say It in Arabic (Egyptian dialect)
Contains over 1,000 useful sentences and phrases for travel or everyday living abroad: food, shopping, medical aid, courtesy, hotels, travel, and other situations. Gives the English phrase, the foreign equivalent, and a transliteration that can be read right off. Also includes many supplementary lists, signs, and aids. All words are indexed.
Dover Publications | 1968-06-01 | 192 pages | PDF | 10 MB
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https://archive.org/details/Mod01_201701