Category Archives: Arabic – English

Teach Yourself Arabic (1962)

 

teach-yourself-books-arabicTeach Yourself Arabic (1962)

rabic is a Semitic language and so different from those usually studied in Europe ; this is perhaps the main
difficulty, there are none of the familiar landmarks. The verbs ‘.have ‘ and ‘ be ‘ do not exist ; when ‘ be ‘ is indispensable, ‘ become ‘ is used as a substitute and it does not take the same case after it as it does before it. The verb has no tenses, only two forms indicating completed and incomplete action. Normally the ‘ finished ‘ form is used
to describe past events but it is also used to express wishes and prayers where the action is only ideally finished. To
make up for this poverty the verb is developed in other ways, thus ‘ be good ‘do well ‘ approve ‘ are all expressed by modifications of the same verb.

Most words are derived from roots which consist of three consonants called radicals ; it is obvious that these roots are not words. The addition of vowels, prefixes, suffixes to the root makes words. In this way some seventy word patterns are made, each with its own meaning. In English ‘ man ‘ ran ‘ fat ‘ are all of the same pattern, a short
vowel between two consonants but one is a noun, one a verb, and one an adjective ; this is impossible in Arabic.
As there are so few word patterns the language sounds rather monotonous ; a poem must have the same rhyme
throughout and it is common to find nearly one hundred lines with a complicated rhyme like aimuhai.

An illustration will make the next point clear. KaTaBa has a vowel between the first and the second radical, yaKTuBu has not. The beginner, especially in trying to hear the language, finds it hard to believe that the syllable yak, which ends in k, has anything to do with words which begin with k.

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A word for word meaning of the Quran

AWordForWordMeaningOfTheQuran

A word for word meaning of the Quran

This set places one or a couple of words of the ayah in one line of a column and gives their meanings side by side in another column, taking care to see that the flow and intelligibility of the English meanings are not thereby lost.
This method enables the reader to identify which English words or phrases represent the meaning of which words in the Arabic text. It has the additional advantage of keeping the meaning strictly to the wording of the text or importing in the meaning any word or expression that has no correspondence with anything in the text.
The numbering has been kept individual for each page. Also grammatical notes, particularly verb forms and verbal nouns, have been given as far as possible. As the words recur at different pages, so their meanings and grammatical notes also have been repeated, giving cross reference to at least one previous occurrence of the word, indicating the page on which and the number under which the word has been explained before.
The aim has been to enable a non-Arab reader to understand the Quran as well as to improve his knowledge of Arabic, particularly the Quranic Arabic.

Teach Yourself Books:Colloquial Arabic ( Egyptian Arabic )

Teach Yourself Books: Colloquial Arabic
By  T.T.Mitchell

This book has been prepared for those who wish to make everyday use of the living language of modern Egypt and for those who would like to add a colloquial Arabic to their knowledge of languages. Its subject is Cairene Arabic, the form of Egyptian colloquial Arabic spoken in Cairo which sets the standards for modern Egyptian usage

Example of pages [Transliteration]

Author: T.T.Mitchell / Date: 1962 / PDF (34,5 MB) – 123 pages Languages: English – Egyptian Arabic

Simplifying Arabic Grammar by Mahmoud Ziyada

simplifying-arabic-grammar

Simplifying Arabic Grammar by Mahmoud Ziyada

You want to learn this language and I want to help you in this endeavor.
The Arabic language is not very difficult as said. In reality, it is a very rich language. Many of the problems students face in studying Arabic are not to do with the language itself. There are other reasons for this difficulty. I hope to be able to help you in your study of Arabic. This book has been developed and written to guide you through some of the basic principles that will give you a head start in mastering the Arabic language.
I have tried to steer away from the commonly found ‘dry’ methods of teaching grammatical principles. Arabic grammar is not simply a set of mathematical and logical principles that the student must memorise.
Furthermore, it needs to be understood that grammar in itself is not the goal, rather it is a means to the understanding of the language and using it correctly.
The methods which promote grammar as the goal and turn it into a mathematical science have many negative effects from a number of angles:
∙ they waste the time of the student exhausting his/her efforts for limited benefit.
∙ they make the study complicated, therefore the student finds the work difficult, and this leads to feelings of hopelessness to the extent that we hear statements such as the Arabic language being complex and difficult to learn.
Achieving true benefit from any language requires dedication and practice.
In this book I have tried to follow simple and effective methods in explaining these principles.

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